Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 MST

So many fallacies. So little time.

There’s an interesting interview with Marshall Auerback of Pinetree Captial Management posted over on Mineweb.com. It’s interesting not because of any particular subject matter, but rather the complete contradictions presented therein. The first half consists of a well-reasoned case for owning gold and why it is being remonetized in an overextended financial system. By contrast, the second half is a fallacy laden justification of many of the failed policies that are driving people to own gold.

Pressure continues to build under the price of silver

In May, I presented what appeared to be an extremely bullish divergence between the price of silver and its Accumulation-Distribution Line (ADL). I asked whether the price of silver would rise to meet its ADL or would the ADL fall to match the price? Two and a half months later, there has been absolutely no resolution to this situation. The divergence remains, and if anything, has actually increased slightly.

The federal budget cannot be balanced

I’m always amazed at the number of people I meet who believe that Washington DC will still get its spending under control, that it’s just a matter of getting the right person, or the right party, into office and disaster will be averted. Or, that when we finally hit a real crisis, politicians will do the right thing – which is, incidentally, the complete opposite of what they’ve been doing for the last 100 years. Those are long odds if you ask me.

More calls for QE3

John Williams, president of the Fed’s San Francisco bank, is the most recent Fed Board member to call for further easing of Fed policy. He joins Dennis Lockhart, head of the Fed’s Atlanta branch, who last called for more quantitative easing.  Both men cited the dismal jobs outlook, and both are voting members of the

Gold for Grabs

In 2011, while Michelle Obama was encouraging Americans to grow gardens to improve their health and finances, another first lady, Leila Trabelsi of Tunisia, was taking a healthy chunk out of Tunisia’s financial reserves.

Paul Krugman reveals how much spending is too much

Recently, on CNBC’s Squawk Box, Paul Krugman ran into some surprisingly strong skepticism about his calls for more government spending. It was clear from the onset that no one was buying into the Keynesian philosophy that infinite government spending will save us all. It wasn’t easy, but the interviewers finally managed to tie him down as to how much spending is too much.

Bill Haynes on KingWorldNews

Fridays, Eric King interviews Dan Norcini of Jim Sinclair’s JSMineset.com and me for KingWorldNews.com’s Weekly Metals Wrap.  Generally, Dan talks about the technical aspects of the market, and I comment on the action in the physicals market.  My remarks are short and usually casual. In last week’s comments, I noted how the atmosphere in the

The Keynesian endgame

In 1971, the dollar was officially relieved of its false promise of gold convertibility by creditors to the United States. In an attempt to spare the world’s economies from the effects of creative destruction, free markets and the invisible hand were traded in for centrally planned economies. Instead of market participants determining who succeeded and failed, that task increasingly became the domain of academicians, central bankers and politicians.

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