Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 MST

Category: Money Markets

More government intervention

One of the tenants of Austrian Economic Theory is non-intervention in the marketplace. However, this concept is lost on economists who think that they know better than the marketplace when it comes to what the marketplace wants. The mortgage market is one such market where the interventionists delight in manipulation. Now, the President himself has

The Fed and the subprime mess

So far, it looks like the world’s central banks have been successful in averting a meltdown of financial markets. However, there may be more work (money to be printed) by the central banks as more problems surface. The latest to report problems in the market include China’s second largest bank, the Bank of China, which

Cameco gets bit by subprime contagion

An often heard knock on gold and silver is that they do not pay interest. Consequently, many investors eschew the precious metals and seek to achieve asset appreciation by compounding interest, a proven path to wealth, assuming things remain normal and the interest and the funds loaned are secure. However, today “things are not normal”

Financial meltdown averted

It is not hyperbolic to say that last week the world’s central banks averted a worldwide financial meltdown. And, it is not an exaggeration to say that the public’s response was a yawn. The central banks prevented the meltdown by “injecting” massive quantities of freshly-created monies into the markets. No new wealth was created, but

The Plunge Protection Team at work

For many years, gold enthusiasts have known about the shenanigans of the Plunge Protection Team (PPT) in the gold market. Now, Eric Englund, in an article on lewrockwell.com, discusses the PPT’s handiwork in the stock market, via a manipulation of the Dow Jones Industrial Average through purchases of General Motors stock. A few interesting notes

Housing bond market set to collapse?

Investors following the housing and the bond markets will find Ambrose Evans-Pritchard’s “Banks set to call in a swathe of loans” an interesting, if not frightening, read. “The fast-moving crisis at two Bear Stearns hedge funds,” the article notes, “exposed the underlying rot in the US sub-prime mortgage market, and the vast nexus of collateralised

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