Friday, September 30th, 2016 MST

Category: Money Markets

Paul Krugman reveals how much spending is too much

Recently, on CNBC’s Squawk Box, Paul Krugman ran into some surprisingly strong skepticism about his calls for more government spending. It was clear from the onset that no one was buying into the Keynesian philosophy that infinite government spending will save us all. It wasn’t easy, but the interviewers finally managed to tie him down as to how much spending is too much.

There is no free market in gold

Anyone who has been paying attention to the precious metals world over the last couple of years is well aware of the circumstantial evidence of price manipulation. None of which is particularly surprising, as all the way up through the gold pool of the late 1960s, it has been the open policy of the US and UK governments to control the dollar price of gold.

Don’t blame the speculators

If you’ve watched the news for any length of time you’ve probably heard mention of speculators and how they seem to be responsible for much of what ills us. Last week, Japan’s Finance Minister Jun Azumi said that a massive intervention in the Yen market was necessary as there were signs of speculation. Much of the price inflation in commodities over the last decade has been…

Ron Paul calls for fedgov to cancel $1.6 billion debt held by Fed

Congressman and presidential candidate Ron Paul recently introduced legislation calling for the federal government to cancel the $1.6 trillion debt held by the Federal Reserve. Such a move creates legal challenges, one of which would be that the Fed would openly acknowledge that it is a private entity and that fedgov has no authority confiscate its assets. (Fedgov had no “authority” to call in gold in 1933, but legal tests to that stood up.)

The sad history of paper money

The sad history of paper money is that it is printed until it is worthless.  This is to say that whenever paper currencies are de-linked from gold or silver (made no longer redeemable in gold or silver), politicians print those currencies until they are worthless. The most infamous destruction of a paper currency occurred in

Fannie Mae/Freddy Mac crisis fillips interest in gold/silver

For some investors, and apparently for the media and for Congress, judging their coverage and comments, the looming failures of Fanny Mae and Freddy Mac were surprises. To other investors, however, the lid was simply pulled off a barrel of rotten apples. For years, the head of Fanny Mae has bragged about lending money to

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