Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 MST

Category: Interesting Issues

The money and banking quiz

If you’re reading this, I suspect that you already have a good understanding of the fraudulent nature of our monetary and banking system (or are well on your way to figuring it out). But how do you communicate that knowledge to someone who has no idea? If you’ve ever tried, you know it’s not easy.

The madness of markets – US Treasuries vs. gold

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is the classic text from 1841 by Charles Mackay that addresses the mass psychology that enables financial bubbles and their inevitable collapses.  The entire book is available here as a free pdf in the Essential Readings section of the site.  Grant Williams follows this theme

Meet the blogger who may have just saved the US economy

Meet the blogger who may have just saved the US economy. Yes, that’s the title of a blog celebrating Bentley University professor Scott Sumner’s championing of the latest and greatest Keynesian scheme to steal from the middle class. He calls it Nominal GDP targeting, but at this point it’s more like looting a burning building.

The federal budget cannot be balanced

I’m always amazed at the number of people I meet who believe that Washington DC will still get its spending under control, that it’s just a matter of getting the right person, or the right party, into office and disaster will be averted. Or, that when we finally hit a real crisis, politicians will do the right thing – which is, incidentally, the complete opposite of what they’ve been doing for the last 100 years. Those are long odds if you ask me.

Gold for Grabs

In 2011, while Michelle Obama was encouraging Americans to grow gardens to improve their health and finances, another first lady, Leila Trabelsi of Tunisia, was taking a healthy chunk out of Tunisia’s financial reserves.

Paul Krugman reveals how much spending is too much

Recently, on CNBC’s Squawk Box, Paul Krugman ran into some surprisingly strong skepticism about his calls for more government spending. It was clear from the onset that no one was buying into the Keynesian philosophy that infinite government spending will save us all. It wasn’t easy, but the interviewers finally managed to tie him down as to how much spending is too much.

The Keynesian endgame

In 1971, the dollar was officially relieved of its false promise of gold convertibility by creditors to the United States. In an attempt to spare the world’s economies from the effects of creative destruction, free markets and the invisible hand were traded in for centrally planned economies. Instead of market participants determining who succeeded and failed, that task increasingly became the domain of academicians, central bankers and politicians.

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